Ron's Blog

  • Rent or Buy: Either Way You’re Paying A Mortgage

    Rent or Buy: Either Way You’re Paying A Mortgage | Simplifying The Market

    Rent or Buy: Either Way You’re Paying A Mortgage

    There are some renters that have not yet purchased a home because they are uncomfortable taking on the obligation of a mortgage. Everyone should realize that, unless you are living with your parents rent free, you are paying a mortgage - either your mortgage or your landlord’s.

    As The Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University explains:

    “Households must consume housing whether they own or rent. Not even accounting for more favorable tax treatment of owning, homeowners pay debt service to pay down their own principal while households that rent pay down the principal of a landlord plus a rate of return.  

    That’s yet another reason owning often does—as Americans intuit—end up making more financial sense than renting.”

    Christina Boyle, a Senior Vice President, Head of Single-Family Sales & Relationship Management at Freddie Mac, explains another benefit of securing a mortgage vs. paying rent:

    “With a 30-year fixed rate mortgage, you’ll have the certainty & stability of knowing what your mortgage payment will be for the next 30 years – unlike rents which will continue to rise over the next three decades.”

    As an owner, your mortgage payment is a form of ‘forced savings’ that allows you to have equity in your home that you can tap into later in life. As a renter, you guarantee your landlord is the person with that equity.

    The graph below shows the widening gap in net worth between a homeowner and a renter:

    Rent or Buy: Either Way You’re Paying A Mortgage | Simplifying The Market

    Bottom Line

    Whether you are looking for a primary residence for the first time or are considering a vacation home on the shore, owning might make more sense than renting with home values and interest rates projected to climb.

  • Don’t Wait! Move Up To Your Dream Home Now!

    Don’t Wait! Move Up To Your Dream Home Now! | Simplifying The Market

    Don’t Wait! Move Up To Your Dream Home Now!

    Now that the housing market has stabilized, more and more homeowners are considering moving up to the home they have always dreamed of. Prices are still below those of a few years ago and interest rates have stayed near historic lows.

    Sellers should realize that waiting to make the move when mortgage rates are projected to increase probably doesn’t make sense. As rates increase, the price of the house you can afford will decrease if you plan to stay within a certain budget for your monthly housing costs. 

    Here is a chart detailing this point:

    Don’t Wait! Move Up To Your Dream Home Now! | Simplifying The Market

    According to Freddie Mac, the current 30-year fixed rate is currently around 3.75%. With each quarter of a percent increase in interest rate, the value of the home you can afford decreases by 2.5% (in this example, by $10,000).

    Freddie Mac predicts that mortgage rates will be closer to 4.7% by this time next year.

    Act now to get the most house for your hard-earned money.

  • Sales Contracts Hit Highest Level in Months

    Sales Contracts Hit Highest Level in Months | Simplifying The Market

    Sales Contracts Hit Highest Level in Months

    The National Association of Realtors (NAR) just announced that the February Pending Home Sales Indexreached its highest reading since July 2015.

    What is the Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI)?

    NAR’s PHSI is “a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings”. The higher the Pending Home Sales Index number, the more contracts have been signed by buyers that will soon translate to sales. February’s Index rose 3.5% month-over-month to 109.1.

    What does this mean for the market?

    Lawrence Yun, NAR’s Chief Economist explained:

    "After some volatility this winter, the latest data is encouraging in that a decent number of buyers signed contracts last month, lured by mortgage rates dipping to their lowest levels in nearly a year and a modest, seasonal uptick in inventory."

    "Looking ahead, the key for sustained momentum and more sales than last spring is a continuous stream of new listings quickly replacing what's being scooped up by a growing pool of buyers. Without adequate supply, sales will likely plateau."

    So What Does This Mean For Buyers?

    There is a lot of competition out there right now for your dream home. Prices are going to continue to climb, act now before you are priced out of your future home.

    What Does This Mean For Sellers?

    If you are on the fence about listing your home for sale and debating whether now is the time to move on with your plans of relocating… don't wait!

    There are more buyers that are ready, willing and able to buy their first, second, third, vacation, or investment property now than there has been in years! The supply of homes for sale is not keeping up with the demand of these buyers.

    Listing your home for sale now will give you the most exposure to buyers and the best sales price.

    Bottom Line

    Whether you are planning on buying or selling a house this year, waiting to act no longer makes sense.

  • The Top 5 Reasons You Should Not For Sale By Owner

    The Top 5 Reasons You Should Not For Sale By Owner | Simplifying The Market

    The Top 5 Reasons You Should Not For Sale By Owner

    In today's market, with homes selling quickly and prices rising, some homeowners might consider trying to sell their home on their own, known in the industry as a For Sale by Owner (FSBO). There are several reasons this might not be a good idea for the vast majority of sellers.

    Here are five of those reasons:

     

    1. There Are Too Many People to Negotiate With

    Here is a list of some of the people with whom you must be prepared to negotiate if you decide to For Sale By Owner:

    • The buyer who wants the best deal possible
    • The buyer’s agent who solely represents the best interest of the buyer
    • The buyer’s attorney (in some parts of the country)
    • The home inspection companies, which work for the buyer and will almost always find some problems with the house
    • The appraiser if there is a question of value

    2. Exposure to Prospective Purchasers

    Recent studies have shown that 89% of buyers search online for a home. That is in comparison to only 20% looking at print newspaper ads. Most real estate agents have an internet strategy to promote the sale of your home. Do you? 

    3. Results Come from the Internet

    Where do buyers find the home they actually purchased?

    • 44% on the internet
    • 33% from a Real Estate Agent
    • 9% from a yard sign
    • 1% from newspaper

    The days of selling your house by just putting up a sign and putting it in the paper are long gone. Having a strong internet strategy is crucial.

    4. FSBOing has Become More and More Difficult

    The paperwork involved in selling and buying a home has increased dramatically as industry disclosures and regulations have become mandatory. This is one of the reasons that the percentage of people FSBOing has dropped from 19% to 8% over the last 20+ years.

    The 8% share represents the lowest recorded figure since NAR began collecting data in 1981.

    5. You Net More Money when Using an Agent

    Many homeowners believe that they will save the real estate commission by selling on their own. Realize that the main reason buyers look at FSBOs is because they also believe they can save the real estate agent’s commission. The seller and buyer can’t both save the commission.

    Studies have shown that the typical house sold by the homeowner sells for $210,000 while the typical house sold by an agent sells for $249,000. This doesn’t mean that an agent can get $39,000 more for your home as studies have shown that people are more likely to FSBO in markets with lower price points. However, it does show that selling on your own might not make sense.

    Bottom Line

    Before you decide to take on the challenges of selling your house on your own, let's meet up so we can discuss the difference having an agent can make.

     
  • Further Proof This Isn’t a Housing Bubble

    Further Proof This Isn’t a Housing Bubble | Simplifying The Market

    Further Proof This Isn’t a Housing Bubble

    Two weeks ago, we posted a blog which explained that current increases in home prices were the result of the well-known concept of supply & demand and should not lead to conversations of a new housing bubble. Today, we want to look at home prices as compared to current incomes.

    Here is a graph showing the monthly mortgage payment on a median priced home in the U.S. over the last 25 years:

    Further Proof This Isn’t a Housing Bubble | Simplifying The Market

    Mortgage payments are currently well below the historic average over that time period. Purchasers are not overextending themselves to buy a home like they did on the run-up to the housing crash.

    Lawrence Yun, the Chief Economist at the National Association of Realtors, recently explained in a Forbes article:

    “Even though home prices are climbing far above people’s income, exceptionally low mortgage rates have permitted people to buy a home without overstretching their budget. For someone making a 20% down payment, the monthly mortgage payment at today’s mortgage rates would take up 15% of a person’s gross income. During the bubble years, it was reaching 25% of income. The long-term historical average is around 20%. Therefore, a middle-income household does not need to overstretch their budget much if at all to buy a typical home.”

    Bottom Line

    Due to low interest rates, demand for housing has dramatically increased. This has caused a jump in home prices. However, low interest rates have also allowed the monthly cost of buying a home to remain well below historic norms. We are in a strong housing market, not a housing bubble.

     

©2020 Ron Randolph. All Rights Reserved. Website by Tetrasys